Exhibit
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Jeffrey’s artworks make reference to various aesthetic and material histories rooted in Indigenous cultures of the Americas and in modern and contemporary subcultures. He is known for creating visually rich paintings and sculptures that mix material, saturated colour, pattern, image, and text to celebrate and amplify the voices of individuals and communities both past and present. This way of working, particularly with technically-demanding handwork, is seen through related work by Jeffrey included in the 2022 Biennial. In All You Took, I Gladly Gave (2013), SPEAK TO ME IN YOUR WAY SO I CAN HEAR YOU (2015), and ALL FOR ONE, ONE FOR ALL (2015), a wide range of found and repurposed objects—found tipi poles, driftwood, wool, canvas—collide with embellishments that reference Indigenous cultural production, from glass beadwork and nylon fringe to metal jingles and ceramics inspired by Mississippian head pots. ALL FOR ONE ONE FOR ALL, with its riotous assemblages of colour, textures and shapes, was the artist’s first work to explore the pre-Columbian ceramic heads but was also the genesis for his transformational garment pieces—the artist has shared that it was the first time he began to think about garment as sculpture.

This project is generously supported by Multiplex.

Related work by Jeffrey Gibson is also on view at the Small Arms Inspection Building and the Museum of Contemporary Art Toronto.

Detailed Audio Description of Jeffrey’s work at 72 Perth:

Audio Guide:

Bio

Jeffrey Gibson (Choctaw-Cherokee, born in 1972, Colorado, USA; lives in Hudson, USA) is an interdisciplinary artist based in Hudson, New York. His artworks reference various aesthetic and material histories rooted in Indigenous cultures of the Americas and modern and contemporary subcultures. Jeffrey’s work has been featured in exhibitions in North America and abroad and can be found in public and private collections, including the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the Denver Art Museum; the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and the Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco. In 2019, Jeffrey was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship.

Location

  • Accessibility

    72 Perth Avenue

    Wheelchair Access – Entrance
    From Bloor Street: The accessible path to 72 Perth Avenue’s main entrance runs southbound along the east side to Besi’s Auto Collision. Cross the street to the west-side sidewalk in front of the fencing and continue south 20 metres. Automatic door activation is to the right of the double doors.

    From Sterling Road: Construction and lack of sidewalks are unfortunately an issue in this up and coming residential area. Travelling northbound, accessible pathways begin on the east and west-side of Perth Avenue. The main entrance of 72 Perth Avenue is at street level.

    Outdoor Exhibition & Shelter
    A portable ramp is available for the doorway from the main exhibition area to the outdoor area. An alternative accessible path is through the fence opening on the west side, 30 metres northbound from the main entrance.

    Washrooms
    Accessible washrooms are located to the left of the main entrance.

    AODA-compliant building

  • Getting There

    72 Perth Avenue

    Parking: Limited paid

    TTC: Near Lansdowne station; Dundas West station; 505 Dundas and 506 Carlton streetcars

    Other Transit: Steps away from the GO/UP Express Bloor station